Cecilee Linke

I can write you a story, teach you French, sing you a song.

Fruits, Veggies, and Other Foods

Today we will be learning about French food!

First, we will start with fruits and vegetables. After all, the French have to eat too! Here are some fruits and vegetables you might see at a typical biweekly French market, or even a French supermarket for that matter.

Fruits and Vegetables in French:

 

You might even notice some words in the above image that look very familiar to you! How many do you recognize?

Click on the words below to hear each one spoken:

Vegetables (Les légumes)

      1. les tomates
= tomatoes

      2. les haricots
= green beans

      3. les petits pois
= peas

      4. les salades
= lettuce

      5. les poireaux
= leeks

      6. les carottes
= carrots

      7. les pommes de terre
= potatoes

      8. les radis
= radishes

 

Cultural notes:

Les poireaux (leeks) are often used in French cooking. Typically you will see them included in dishes that have creamy sauces. Their taste is like an onion, since leeks are a member of the onion family, but leeks are much milder in flavor, and it’s said that those who don’t like onions usually like leeks.

 

Fruits (les fruits):

      9. la pomme
 = apple

      10. la poire
 = pear

      11. les cerises
 = cherries

      12. la pêche
 = peaches

      13. les prunes
 = plums

      14. les fraises
 = strawberries

      15. le raisin
 = grape

      16. les abricots
 = apricots

 

Other Foods:

That’s all fine and dandy if we want to eat nothing but fruits and veggies (which admittedly, are good for your health and you should eat them!). But what about meals and other foods?

French meals are almost always eaten with le pain, which is usually purchased fresh that day. I remember being over there and buying baguettes for .50 euros (probably about $0.75; dirt cheap for a piece of bread!). As the saying goes: Un repas sans pain est comme un jour sans soleil. (A meal without bread is like a day without sun)

le pain (as a baguette)

le pain


Here are a variety of foods that you might see on a typical French menu (though this is definitely a non-exhaustive list!)

la bouillabaisse, a seafood stew typical of southern France and usually made of that day's catch

la bouillabaisse – a seafood stew typical of southern France that includes a myriad of seafood such as mussels, oysters, and various fish. It can be as complicated or as simple as you want! It is usually made of that day’s catch

la quiche, a pie-crust dish with a savory custard filling of meat, cheese, eggs and other various ingredients

la quiche – a pie-crust dish with a savory custard filling of meat, cheese, eggs and other various ingredients. The most common is a quiche Lorraine, which originated in the Lorraine section of eastern France, a region bordering Germany

le croque-monsieur, a grilled ham and cheese sandwich that is sometimes served with a fancy cheese sauce on top (this version does not have that)

le croque-monsieur – a grilled ham and cheese sandwich that is sometimes served with a fancy cheese sauce on top (the version pictured here does not have that). It originated in Parisian cafés as a quick snack food.

la ratouille - you might remember the movie of the same name! A delicious vegetable stew originating in southern France

la ratatouille – you might remember the movie of the same name! A delicious vegetable stew originating in southern France that includes an assortment of summer vegetables such as eggplant, zucchini, bell peppers, and tomatoes.

le bœuf bourguignon, the name translates to Beef Burgundy, so named for not just the area it originated (the area of Burgundy in southwestern France) but also the wine used in this delectable beef stew

le bœuf bourguignon – the name translates to Beef Burgundy, named for not just the area it originated (the area of Burgundy in eastern France) but also the wine used in this delectable beef stew

les saucisses, an important food in French cuisine, there are many kinds of sausages such as boudin and andouillette, all made from different parts of the animal

les saucisses – an important food in French cuisine, there are many kinds of sausages such as boudin and andouillette, all made from different parts of the animal

la blanquette de veau - a creamy stew of onions and tender veal, sometimes served with potatoes

la blanquette de veau – a creamy stew of onions and tender veal, sometimes served with potatoes on the side.

la mousse au chocolat - Now who doesn't love chocolate mousse? Mousse can also be made from other ingredients such as strawberry and raspberry, but chocolate mousse is more common

la mousse au chocolat – Now who doesn’t love chocolate mousse? Mousse can also be made from other ingredients such as strawberry and raspberry, but chocolate mousse is more common

Click on the words below to hear them spoken:

      17. le pain
      18. la bouillabaisse
      19. la quiche
      20. le croque-monsieur
      21. la ratatouille
      22. le boeuf bourguignon
      23. les saucisses
      24. la blanquette de veau
      25. la mousse au chocolat

 

Extras:

If you love to cook, check out these recipes for the foods we just learned! The easier recipes are at the top, with the more complicated (but still very tasty!) ones toward the bottom of the list.

Croque-monsieur

Ratatouille

Bouillabaisse

Quiche

Bœuf bourguignon

Blanquette de veau

Mousse au chocolat

 

Homework:

1) Think of at least 5 other fruits and 5 other vegetables (if you want to write more, you can!) that you would like to know how to say in French. List them on a piece of paper and then look them up on Word Reference and write the French word next to the English words.

2) Choose any 5 fruits, any 5 vegetables, and any 5 of the meal foods we have learned in French and create an illustration for each of them, with the word in French at the top of the paper and your picture below it.

 

So next time you’re at the supermarket, see how many fruits and vegetables you can name in French!

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